Hale SONTAŞ 2001


Born in Istanbul in 1943. In 1960 Sontaş attended the the History of Art Department of Istanbul University and took the European Art courses from Prof. Oetinger, Proj Scheie and Prof. S. Eyice whose ideas influenced and shaped her future studies. In 1962 she transfered to the Istanbul Academy of Fine Arts. In 1967 Sontaş; went to Switzerland and persued her studies abroad.In Geneve and Neuchatal she worked on painting and textile design. In 1968 she returned to Turkey and graduated from Bedri Rahmi Eyüboğlu's workshop. In 1969 she worked on painting in Greece, Italy, Germany, Switzerland, France and the United States and worked on tapestry in Aubusson. In 1970 she worked on knotted carpets in Hereke, Taşpinar and Isparta.In 1971-2 she studied painting in France and realized numerous exhibitions, joint and individual, in and outside Turkey. Concerning the developing of her art, Sontaş says: In 1970's, in my huge canvasses, I used to experiment with forms of Ottoman calligraphy. Playing with contrasts and searches in aesthetics led me to discover the possibilities of different media...found myself making tapestry. Then, suddenly the human figure entered my canvasses . Painting, for me, began to be a means of expression and correlation. The theme of 'woman' with an emphasis on her fertility and motherhood, gradually developed into worn-out, aged, deformed, used up bodies. These are women who have not really grasped life, who have merely accepted the way of living offered to them, who have silently done whatever was demanded of them, who have acquiesed and, as a result, lived by the flesh. Hence the owners of these tired bodies: 'the carbon-hydrate women' A critic Güven Turan points out that these are the daughters of primitive wall painting women; the mother goddesses of early history, that they are not individuals but images of a concept. 6 works of artist are being exhibited in our site.The prices of these works are between 400$-5000$. For the enlarged images please click on them.


Works;



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